Category Archives: Cross Overs

Social Observations

Having never studied architecture, sociology, let alone urban planning (a pity in retrospect), I guess I shouldn’t be surprised that I missed this classic film by William H. Whyte. I think I’ll chalk this one up to better late, than never. Enjoy.

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Home Viewing

When you grow up (professionally) in a city with some of the best museums in the world, you become spoiled.

This I know.

When you live in a city that has some world class museums, you manage to make due.

This I have done.

When said museums have been closed for renovations for 5 years, what do you do?

These days, this is what I do.

(Untitled Curiosity)

As I was sipping my morning coffee, and reading the NY Times online, I came across a review for a new movie that piqued my interest. The film, titled (Untitled), is a satire about the art world.

Being a fan, as well as a participant of previous portrayals of the art world, I can only hope that the Times review is (more or less) in the ball park. Granted, it obviously had a much bigger budget, but that’s another thing to write about on another day.

Why can’t we be friends?

I’m not sure what I can add to this little compilation.

Girls (and Boys) on Film

I could go on and on about how genius this video is, but I won’t.

In short: The Onion has done it again.

Mondo Venziano

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Venice is a great adventure…

For those of you who won’t be able to make it to high noon in the sinking city this week, I suggest you try and track down a copy of Mondo Veneziano, a small gem made by Antoine Prum, starring (amongst others) a very talented American artist/actor.

Update 2013 – It can now be viewed online here.

Bloodwork

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I was procrastinating, yet again, on youtube this morning, and came across something that caught my attention. It was trailer for a film I hadn’t heard about called Bloodwork – The Anna Mendieta Story. The film, made by Richard Move, mixes interviews (with Carolee Scneeman, B. Ruby Rich, Yvonne Rainer, Jose Esteban Munoz, and Lisa Paul Streitfeld) with super 8 recreations of Mendieta’s performative works.

A few years ago, a friend recommended that I read Robert Katz’s Naked by the Window, which is a ‘crime novel’, about the events that occurred at 300 Mercer Street, on September 8th 1985, which created a fissure within the New York art scene. One side of the New York art world circling wagons around Andre, and another committed to seeing justice pursed on behalf of Mendieta.

While the book is flawed, and is clearly written by someone with a limited knowledge of contemporary art, it’s the most comprehensive account of what happened. What made the book all the more compelling, is the fact that the trial took place during my first few years at art school in New York. In some ways it was my introduction to the art world, sadly enough.

When I looked at Move’s Director’s Notes, I saw that Galerie Lelong, which represents Mendieta’s estate, had no interest in collaborating on the film. I suppose I shouldn’t be too surprised.